May 042017
 

It’s spring, finally and I’m busy trying to get seeds into the ground.

I found these critters in the greenhouse:

This ugly sucker was getting ready to pop deadly little babies all over the place.

Looks like they came in with the fertilizer I bought some years back.

I don’t like black widows and they’re not native to this particular area (too cold here), but they survived the winter apparently. In the greenhouse, where it stays a lot warmer then the surroundings. I had tried to let the greenhouse freeze up hard by leaving the doors open for a while, but spiders can create a natural anti-freeze and if it is not really cold enough, they’ll survive.

These two mama’s didn’t. So far, I’ve found four adults. So there is still probably more.

Garden boxes are now all planted – beans, carrots, corn, beets. The high fence is necessary – the deer are major predators here.

I’ve got thirteen of these horse troughs. Somewhere on this blog is the story of how I did this project.

Looks like my strawberries (transplanted last year) made it through our long winter.

Some of the kale, radishes and spinach has sprouted up nicely in the greenhouse. I’ve cut way back on how much the greenhouse gets planted because it’s simply too much.

The pots below are my new replacements (purchased used) from the square “bakery buckets” I used before. They did not last and quickly deteriorated in the sun.

A closer look of the tomato starts, drip irrigation and horse-panel fencing I used for the tables and trellis work.

I still need to do potatoes, and onions but not squash (not a fan).

The soil here is pretty lousy and the growing season is usually short. Even so, I’m a month early planting this year and probably could have planted several weeks ago. Climate change is quite noticeable here.

Here’s a few links from the past:
Garden Boxes, Greenhouse Tables

Garden Boxes, Greenhouse Watering Setup

  3 Responses to “Spring Planting”

  1.  

    You need a brigade of praying mantises, I think.

    Does your local hospital have the appropriate antivenin for black widows?

    Anyway, how did you deal with the infestation?

    •  

      I’ve no idea if the hospital has anything. Hope so, but hoping more that nobody gets bitten. They’re not aggressive, but need to be watched out for.

      I kill them with a stick. I have some spray poison too. Everything else is organic, but the greenhouse does attract plenty of bugs for spiders to eat. Generally, I leave spiders alone, just not these.

      •  

        According to the website the bite of a black widow is not normally fatal, but is definitely to be avoided.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latrodectism

        Latrodectism is the illness caused by the bite of Latrodectus spiders (the black widow spider and related species). Pain, muscle rigidity, vomiting, and sweating are the hallmarks of latrodectism. Contrary to popular conception, latrodectism is very rarely fatal to people. Domestic cats have been known to die with convulsion and paralysis.